Here’s why DeAndre Hopkins is thankful for his rookie WR teammates

The Texans over the last few years have been a team powered by their J.J. Watt-led defense. Watt is still the team’s best player, and the defense is still likely to be the better unit, but Houston should at the very least be a bit more balanced this year, thanks to the new additions.

That shift in balance has Hopkins thinking his squad will return to the postseason.

“Team-wise, definitely looking for playoffs for us,” Hopkins said. “I don’t like talking ahead, but the guys’ attitude and the vibe in the locker room is good. I feel real good about this team and what it can do.”

The culprit is covered up on this day, yet still torments the victim every single moment. It’s not physical pain, which is long gone, but it’s the emotional part of the crime that still chafes Myles Jack.

The perpetrator in this case is Jack’s right knee, or, more precisely, the circus it created over a six-week span in March and April, leading to a drop out of the first round for a player considered by some to be the best in this year’sNFL Draft.

“Imagine getting robbed with no gun or no mask for $10 million?” Jack said. “You just have to live with it.”

The $10 million is the guestimate for what his injured knee cost Jack dropping out of the first round. It is money that he will never get back, no matter how long he plays or how good he becomes as a linebacker for theJacksonville Jaguars.

That’s the hurt.

That’s the pain.

Money isn’t everything, as the saying goes, but try dealing with losing $10 million as your draft status falls quicker than you can say bad knee.

When I last sat down with Jack before the draft in late March in Arizona, he was optimistic, excited, eager, his dream of playing in the NFL less than a month away. The process of rehabbing a torn meniscus, suffered last September at UCLA, had been a grueling one, but by late March the end was near.

“I’m so glad to have all the knee stuff behind me,” he said then.

The Dolphins, who took Tunsil at No. 13, were also reportedly interested in Apple. There’s a good chance he wasn’t falling that far. But the move would also have netted the Giants an additional second-round pick at minimum.

Compare the two hauls:

Also available at No. 51 (where the Jets took Christian Hackenberg) were linebackers Deion Jones (LSU) and Su’a Cravens (USC).

In short, it’s surprising the Giants didn’t gamble on the possibility of Apple falling in order to pick up an additional high-quality player in a spot where the draft was deepest.

The Jets’ haul would have obviously changed as well. Stealing Tunsil at No. 10 would’ve made up for losing Hackenberg and/or Juston Burris in the fourth round.

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